Posts Tagged ‘Hosta’

Hosta ‘Rhino Hide’

If slugs seem to be winning the battle in your Hosta Garden, we recommend giving Hostas one more try.  Hosta ‘Rhino Hide‘ is as tough as nails!  The thick substance of  ‘Rhino Hide‘ make this a real match for slugs.  The extra thick leaves have extra wide blue margins with a splash of light green up the center.  The leaves are cupped shape, giving this Hosta more dimensional look.  Although ‘Rhino Hide‘ can withstand full sun, it is recommended that it be planted in a more part shade location.  In mid summer watch for the white flowers to emerge.

Share

We got some very nice hostas from Rod & Heidi this year for our gardens…we have a very large hosta garden with over 750 different varieties of hosta..I also have some of my own hybrids I’ve been working on…Here are some photos to let you ‘walk’ through our gardens.

bevie2

Hosta Hills

Some of Bevie's Hybrids

Some of Bevie's Hybrids

Hosta Hills

Hosta Hills

Hosta Hills

Hosta Hills

Share

Dicentra spectabilis ‘Gold Heart’

Dicentra spectabilis 'Gold Heart' 1x1Spring color is such a welcome site! For those of you who have shade and dark places in your garden you may consider Dicentra  ‘Gold Heart’ to brighten up your day. Dicentra ‘Gold Heart’ is a  stunning gold-leaved form of the old-time favorite common bleeding heart! Arching peach-colored stems carry chains of deep pink heart-shaped flowers above the dramatic metallic gold leaves. The fern-like foliage appears early in the spring and provides a colorful point of interest in the shade garden. Like other Dicentra spectabilis, ‘Gold Heart‘ will go dormant during the heat of the summer. We recommend planting near hostas or ferns that will fill in the area after the Dicentra foliage dies back.

Share

Hosta ‘Fire Island’

I love to look out in my shade garden and see bright colors. The chartreuse green color leaves on Hosta ‘Fire Island’ really stand out from a distance. And then when you go in for a closer look you see unique deep red stems. Hostas offer a wide range of colors and sizes, Be sure to check out all our hostas.

(Hosta) Hosta ‘Fire Island‘ is a beacon in the garden with screaming yellow leaves with rippled margins. The unique red coloration of the petioles (leaf stems) extends into the base of the leaves for a wonderful contrast. In the summer, the foliage darkens to chartreuse. Hosta ‘Fire Island’ is a vigorous grower that shows best in full shade.

Share

Caring for Your Hostas

100_7252a

Description: With its ease of growth, variety of plant shapes and sizes available, and diversity of leaf colorations, Hosta is one of the most desirable perennials for gardens with partial to full shade. In the landscape, the foliage can provide a bold presence while softening the appearance of well defined areas.

Hosta forms attractive mounds of basal foliage. The shape of the leaves ranges from narrow elliptic to very broad ovate or heart shaped. The leaf texture may be shiny, smooth, or puckered and consists of numerous colorations of yellow, white, and greens to blue-green with and without distinct veining or variegation.

They produce lily-like, bell-shaped, white, lilac, or blue colored flowers on stalks that rise above the foliage in the mid summer. Many cultivars produce fragrant flowers which are great for attracting hummingbirds into the garden.

There are literally hundreds of cultivars, hybrids, and species to choose from. Hostas are most commonly referred by only their cultivar names as the parentage is often unclear. With the diversity of leaf colorations, plant habits, flowering characteristics and ease of growth, Hostas will likely remain one of the most popular perennials of the 21st century.

Preferred Conditions: Hosta prefers to be planted in locations with a fertile, moist, well-drained soil. However, they are tolerant of a wide range of soil conditions.

Most Hosta cultivars will grow more vigorously and have the best leaf coloration when they are planted in locations with partial shade, particularly in the afternoon. Many cultivars, especially variegated ones, will show signs of marginal leaf burn when grown in full afternoon sun. In general, gold- or yellow leafed cultivars can tolerate more sun, while blue-leafed or cultivars with lots of white variegation require more shady conditions.

Planting & Maintenance: Containerized Hosta can be planted throughout the growing season, but are most commonly planted in the spring or the fall. They should be planted even with or just slightly higher then the soil line.

Generally considered easy to grow and require little routine maintenance. To maintain a clean and attractive appearance, many gardeners remove the flower stalks once the blossoms have faded. Mulching during the summer months will help keep the soil moist and reduce leaf scald on plants in sunnier locations. The foliage should be cut back at the end of the growing season. They can be divided every 3 to 4 years if the clumps become too large.

Pests and Diseases: Generally, they can be grown without many insect or disease problems. Aphids, crown rots, leaf spots, slugs, and spider mites may occasionally become problematic.
Of these pests, slugs will likely be the most prevalent and may require removing them by hand, trapping, or using baits to keep them from severely damaging the foliage. Some cultivars may get leaf scorch when they are planted in hot, full sun.

Uses in the Garden: Hosta are commonly used as accent or specimen plants, in woodland gardens or rock gardens, in borders, and as edging plants, groundcovers or mass plantings.

Other Uses and Attributes: They are commonly used in patio pots or smaller cultivars can be utilized as components in mixed containers. The flower spikes make fine additions to cut flower arrangements. When blooming they attract hummingbirds into the garden. These tough plants are also resistant to rabbit feeding.

Share